News

Schools Searching for Ways to Offset Busing Cuts 

By: Robert J. Hawkins | 9:06 a.m., Dec. 14, 2011, Updated 9:04 p.m.

Education officials across San Diego County are scrambling to keep school buses rolling after the governor’s announcement this week that the state will cut $248 million in school transportation funding beginning Jan. 1.

School districts plan to tap reserves or adjust budgets — if they can — to make up for the loss of about $15 million in state funding in the county.  READ MORE >>>

Teen Marijuana Use Up, Alcohol Down

By The Associated Press  |  7:01 a.m., Dec. 14, 2010

— America's teens are using more marijuana and less alcohol, according to an annual government study of eighth-, 10th- and 12th-graders across the country.

Some 6.1 percent of high-school seniors reported using marijuana this year, up from 5.2 percent in 2009, according to the Monitoring the Future survey released by the National Institutes of Health.

Marijuana use by 10th-graders climbed from 2.8 percent to 3.3 percent, and for eighth-grade students it edged up from 1.0 percent to 1.2 percent.  READ MORE >>>

Schools Spared From Deepest Cuts

By Michael Gardner & Maureen Magee • U-T  |  12:01 a.m., Dec. 14, 2011

— Gov. Jerry Brown said Tuesday that cash-strapped California must impose $1 billion in spending cuts starting Jan. 1, but K-12 classrooms will be spared from the most punishing reductions.

Nevertheless, the retrenchment will still be painful across the state, with school busing, colleges, universities and social service programs taking the largest blows. State spending on libraries and some public safety programs will also be slashed.

Sweeping cuts had been anticipated because a state budget agreement required automatic reductions if revenues fell short of projections by the end of the year. But the shortfall wasn’t as bad as expected and the cuts amount to half of what was being projected just last month.

K-12 schools did not escape completely. The state will reduce its general allocation to schools by nearly $80 million, or $13.18 per student. But that’s far less than the $1 billion, or closer to $160 per student, that had been estimated in an earlier scenario.  READ MORE >>>

Calif School Districts Sue State Over Funding Cuts

— A coalition of school districts and education groups sued the state of California on Wednesday, seeking the restoration of more than $2 billion in funding they say public schools are owed under state law.  READ MORE>>>

Driving and Texting Nothing to LOL About

Hayes and two classmates got first-hand lessons about texting while driving during a distracted driver demonstration at Temescal Canyon High School in Lake Elsinore.

They drove a curvy course in the school parking lot, first without a phone and then while texting.

The first ride for all three went smoothly. Not so the second one.  Read more>>>
 The Hidden Impact of High School Dropouts

Most San Diegans do not realize the enormous impact high school dropouts have on our city. The California Dropout Research Project at the University of California Santa Barbara has estimated the lifetime cost of one class or cohort of dropouts for the state at $24.2 billion. These are real criminal justice, incarceration and victim costs. The researchers also project that one year’s crop of dropouts will go on to commit 113,954 violent crimes.  READ MORE>>>

Carlsbad Unified Eyes Deep Cuts

— Carlsbad Unified School District officials will face about $11 million worth of budget decisions starting next week as they embark on a budget balancing journey that won’t end until board members formally approve a spending plan in June.

Board members, officials and community members are set to discuss possible cuts Wednesday that would help fill a projected $11 million hole in the district’s $82 million operating budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1. Options could range from closure of an elementary school, which would save $400,000, to a nine-day reduction of the school year to shave $2.1 million from the budget.   READ MORE>>>

State Shortfall Could Trigger Early Cuts

— State budget forecasts to be issued in the coming weeks have taken on a new sense of urgency this year, foreshadowing potential immediate and steep cuts to social services, schools and libraries throughout San Diego County.

Few programs outside of public safety that rely on state funding will be immune from reductions if those economic projections find that expected revenues will be far off the mark. If that’s the case, programs across the state could lose as much as $2.46 billion.  READ MORE>>>
Preparing for the SAT and ACT

Kathryn Adelstein has been preparing students to take college placement exams for 15 years. She knows the ins and outs of the SAT and ACT, the pros and cons of each and the “tips and trips” that can help a student achieve success or failure.   READ MORE>>>

OTHER COLLEGE PREP ARTICLES>>>

An Early Start is Crucial to Tackle Financial Aid for College

If you're the parents of a student who has just one more year to go in high school, you might be telling yourself the worst is over.

Kids who are now seniors have slogged through three years of grueling curriculum and can boast that they have survived the much-feared SAT. In their spare time, many of these teenagers have probably racked up enough volunteer hours to impress a saint. Just about all that's left for these kids is filling out the college applications, which schools will accept as early as this fall, and then waiting for fat acceptance letters.

But wait. There is the little matter of paying the bills, which unfortunately is often pushed aside until the acceptance verdicts are in.

While many students do a great job of positioning themselves to get into the best schools possible, their families often flunk a task that is critically important: Maximizing the chances for financial aid.

Mastering the college financial aid process can be far more challenging than impressing admission officers.  READ MORE>>>
Concert at MVHS will raise money for equipment

By STACY BRANDT sbrandt@nctimes.com
North County Times
| Posted: Monday, September 19, 2011 2:27 pm

A student and teacher at Mission Vista High School have teamed up to organize a rock concert at the campus Friday to raise money for musical equipment.

Students ---- bands, duos and solo musicians ---- will perform short sets as part of the "Rock the Hill 2011" concert at the school's outdoor stage. Money raised will pay for three new monitor speakers for the school, which students will use for musical and theatrical performances... READ MORE>>>

PTSA President Welcomes 11-12 School Year

It is my pleasure of being able to welcome each of you back to MVHS for our third year. As your Parent/Teacher/Student Association president, I am grateful to each of you for your demonstrated interest in this organization and your support thus far. 

To succeed as a PTSA we need two things: your membership and your buy-in. The MVHS PTSA was founded to help support the school, the teachers and, most importantly, the students of Mission Vista High School. Your membership dues provide the seed money we need to execute our student-focused programs; your buy in will provide the parent and student volunteers we need to make this organization a success. I’ve attached a membership form for you to complete and bring to registration. I understand there are many competing time and financial priorities for us all; here are a few reasons why you should continue to support our Mission Vista PTSA:

WE’RE DIFFERENT – WE’RE BETTER

MVHS PTSA is not like other PTAs you’ve worked with.  We’re different…we’re better. We are a part of the MVHS education team…a force multiplier for the teachers, parents and administrators. We aim to augment the curricula by adding additional programs for our students that will enhance their education, prepare them for college/careers, expand their horizons, open doors of opportunity, and make them better students/people.

-          MVHS PTSA believes
  o   Teachers are an integral piece of the collaborative partnership between home and school
  o   Effective home-school communication improves student performance. 
  o  PTSA fosters collaborative engagement between parents, teachers, students, staff and the community

WHAT WE DO THAT MAKES US BETTER

We have a vision – to be a tool for the success of our students AND teachers.

-          Your PTSA is committed to the students’ success via programs like:
   o   PSAT Preparation
   o   Teen Driving Safety
   o   Career Day
   o   Art/Talent recognition
   o   4.0 GPA recognition
   o   Student Scholarship endowments
   o   Facilitating continuing education grants and scholarships for our most precious resource—our teachers.

There are a LOT of great things happening at our school—we need your help to make it happen. My commitment to you is that we will be clear and specific about our requests for volunteers. All of us can spare an hour or two now and then in support of MVHS-we’ll work to make it easy and fun!

Sincerely,

Sean Cunneen
President, Mission Vista High PTSA

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Superintendent Joyce Bales Will Retire This Year

Our Vista Unified School District Superintendent, Dr. Joyce Bales,will be retiring at the end of this school year.  She announced her retirement recently during a school board of trustees meeting.  For more information, go to

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2011/jul/29/vista-superintendent-retire/.

MVHS PTSA Received $800 Grant for New Library Build-up Project

Mission Vista High PTSA was the recipient of an $800 grant from the 9th District Grant Committee.  This money will be used to help build up our new school's library.  If you'd like to donate to this particular effort, please contact a member of our board to arrange your contribution. 

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